Tag Archives: science fiction

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Tenet

1,170 words

Christopher Nolan is one of my favorite living filmmakers. Tenet is Nolan’s new sci-fi espionage thriller. Tenet is highly imaginative and visually striking, filmed on locations in Denmark, Estonia, India, Italy, Norway, and the UK. Its cast includes Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Michael Caine, and Kenneth Branagh.

But Tenet is not Nolan’s best work, for two main reasons. Read more …

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Where No Übermensch Has Gone Before:
Rainbow Albrecht’s Space Vixen Trek Episode 17

There’s a lot going on in this cover.

2,467 words

Rainbow Albrecht
Space Vixen Trek Episode 17: Tomorrow the Stars
Smashwords, 2018

“Think of how well things have been going for America over the last two decades. So by 2008, unemployment and poverty surely will exist only in history books. With all the money available for research budgets by then, we’ll probably get technological miracles like antigravity propulsion sooner than expected.” Read more …

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Beautiful, But Dumb:
Gattaca

2,053 words

Gattaca (1997) is a dystopian science fiction movie set sometime in the mid-21st century. Mankind is doing a lot of manned space exploration. Genetic engineering and zygote selection have eliminated major and minor genetic problems, from mental illness to baldness. As a smiling black man who works as a eugenics counselor explains to a pair of prospective parents, the children produced by these techniques “are still you, just the best of you.” Read more …

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Interstellar

1,562 words

In 2010, Christopher Nolan released one of the greatest science fiction films of all time: Inception. Inception is stunningly artful and imaginative, as well as dramatically gripping and emotionally powerful. (See my review here.)

Then, four years later, Nolan released Interstellar, which is almost as good. It may seem silly not to want to “spoil” a film that has been out for six years, but if you haven’t seen it, I want you to see it. Read more …

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Warhammer 40,000

2,663 words

“In the Grim Darkness of the Far Future, there is only WAR . . .” tells us the strap line of the world’s most popular miniature wargame. In the 41st Millennium, mankind has collapsed after a Dark Age of Technology and an Age of Strife, and is set upon by nefarious, merciless alien races. Humanity is struggling against a primordial force of the universe — Chaos — that corrupts and deforms men into inhuman monsters.

Read more …

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Who’s Ready for Black Elves in Middle Earth?

1,480 words

Tolkien world experienced two huge events this month.

Amazon announced last week the diverse cast for its new Lord of the Rings series. Shortly thereafter, Christopher Tolkien, J. R. R. Tolkien’s editor and the guardian of his father’s legacy, died. (Hopefully, there was no connection between the events.) Read more …

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Ad Astra

1,564 words

Ad Astra (2019), starring Brad Pitt and directed by James Gray, is the best science fiction movie since Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar (2014). Like Interstellar, Ad Astra is visually striking and emotionally powerful, stimulating to both thought and imagination, and unfolds at a leisurely pace—all traits inviting comparisons to Kubrick and Tarkovsky, although I hasten to add that I found both Ad Astra and Interstellar so absorbing that my attention never wavered. Read more …

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The Mandalorian

1,271 words

“Help us, Dave Filoni. You’re our only hope.”

On December 20th, J. J. “Death Star” Abrams and Disney Corp. will complete the destruction of the Star Wars saga that many of us have loved since childhood, while raking in untold millions by cynically exploiting nostalgia for the mythos they are desecrating. So pass the popcorn, because I’ll be right there, dear readers, to review it for you. Read more …

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Technologická utopie a etnický nacionalismus

2,614 slov

English original here

Poznámka autora: Následuje přepis mé řeči, která zazněla na čtvrtém setkání fóra Scandza v Kodani 15. září 2018. Při svém minulém vystoupení na Scandza fóru jsem hovořil o nutnosti vytvořit zvláštní etnonacionalistické poselství pro všechny bělošské skupiny, včetně třeba fandů Star Treku. Následující řádky tedy budiž jakousi epištolou určenou „Trekkies“. Rád bych také poděkoval všem účastníkům i organizátorům fóra Skandza. (na videozáznam řeči se můžete podívat zde)

Read more …

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I am Mother

1,618 words

How do you break into Hollywood? Director Grant Sputore and writer Michael Lloyd Green might have a few tips for you in their first full-length feature film for Netflix. Released in 2019, their debut, I am Mother, does all it can to please the Hollywood elite and bring a warm glow of smug satisfaction into the bleeding hearts of their old college professors.

It takes a man to write a great feminist movie, and with their all-female cast, these two guys lay it on twice as thick. Read more …

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Memory: The Origins of Alien

2,076 words

Director Alexandre O. Philippe has followed up his 2017 documentary on the shower scene in Psycho (78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene) with Memory: The Origins of Alien, a documentary on the creation of Alien that attempts to chart the film’s wide-ranging influences and explore its mythic resonance. The result is an underwhelming muddle that lacks direction and often retreads old ground, particularly in an overlong segment on the chestburster scene. Read more …

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Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness

1,534 words

H. P. Lovecraft’s novella At the Mountains of Madness, serialized in Astounding in 1936, is one of his greatest works. The tale recounts an expedition to Antarctica in 1930 in which scholars from Miskatonic University stumble upon the ruins of a lost city. Read more …

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The Greatest Anti-Immigration Film of All Time: Brightburn

1,024 words

The best propaganda approaches its subject in an oblique manner. The most effective way to present a message is to insinuate it within the context of a seemingly unrelated narrative. This is a common practice of the Left, and is one that is seldom used by the Right; or when it is used, is generally done so in a clumsy and/or laughable manner. Think Dinesh D’Souza or the Left Behind movies which are so beloved by fundamentalists. Read more …

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Daft Punk’s Electroma

2,488 words

Daft Punk’s Electroma is a 2007 science fiction drama written and directed by the famous electronic house music duo, Daft Punk (Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter), who wear iconic robot outfits as part of their act. Daft Punk formed in 1993 and found success through their 1997 debut album Homework, 2001’s Discovery, and the critically mixed 2005 Human After All. Electroma, released in 2006, is an elaboration on Human After All‘s themes of technology and personal authenticity. Read more …

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Herding Cats:
Individualism & Dystopia in Lao She’s Cat Country

2,498 words

“When I was little, this was a large village. And that was not too many years ago; now, there’s not so much as a single shadow. The destruction of an entire people can come about very easily!”[1]

Lao She’s Cat Country is one of the finest pieces of literature I’ve read. Written in 1932 in the long shadow of the Bolshevik Revolution and foreshadowing the Maoist terror that would wrack China, Read more …

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Starship Troopers

2,086 words

Robert A. Heinlein’s Starship Troopers (1959) marked his transition from writing juvenile pulp science fiction to serious novels of ideas, in this case setting forth a highly reactionary and militarist political philosophy. Paul Verhoeven’s 1997 film of Starship Troopers takes quite a few liberties with Heinlein’s plot but manages to capture its spirit and communicate its key ideas. Read more …

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Detroit: Become Human as Seen from the Right

4,353 words

Detroit: Become Human is one of the most brazen examples of anti-white Communist propaganda that the video game industry has ever vomited onto an unsuspecting public. It’s the work of the ostensibly French David Cage (whose real name is David De Gruttola), the physical embodiment of the frustrated filmmaker turned game director. Read more …

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David Lynch’s Dune

5,550 words

David Lynch’s third feature film is his 1984 adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science fiction classic Dune. Herbert’s Dune is widely hailed as a masterpiece, while Lynch’s Dune has a much more mixed reputation, tending toward the negative. When I first saw Lynch’s Dune, I was deeply disappointed. Herbert’s novel had left a powerful and vivid impression on me, and Lynch’s vision was not my vision. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Responses
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Racial Exterminationism in Rakka

2,414 words

Rakka is a science fiction short film from director Neil Blomkamp. After being propelled to fame by District 9, Blomkamp went on to make Elysium, a less well-received and overtly preachy movie that has rightly drawn the ire of White Nationalists; both Gregory Hood and Kevin MacDonald have ably covered its breathtakingly arrogant subtext and narrative shortcomings. Following up Elysium with the poorly reviewed Chappie, a multiculturalist movie about rappers and a police robot, Read more …

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Fighting the Forever War in NieR: Automata

3,103 words

“This pain, this sadness! This desperation! You know nothing about it!”

(Major story spoilers ahead.)

NieR: Automata is a critically acclaimed 2017 JRPG from renowned director Yoko Taro, and is an indirect sequel to his previous NieR and Drakenguard games. The game is a niche action-adventure gem, balancing engrossing narrative with tense, challenging combat. Read more …

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Guide to Kulchur, Episode 12
Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker

159 words / 1:25:24

In the latest installment of Guide to Kulchur, Fróði Midjord and John Morgan discuss Andrei Tarkovsky’s Russian science fiction classic, Stalker, which is about three men living in an industrial wasteland who venture into a Zone that was left on Earth by mysterious extraterrestrials, a wilderness filled with deadly traps, at the center of which is a room that grants the innermost desires of anyone who enters. The duo discuss the film both as an allegory of a spiritual quest as well as an indictment of modernity. Read more …

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The Day of the Triffids as a White Survival Parable

3,795 words

The Day of the Triffids is a 1951 novel by the English science fiction writer John Wyndham. Prior to serving in the Second World War, Wyndham wrote short stories for pulp magazines, and The Day of the Triffids was his first book, published when he was 48. It launched his short but illustrious career as a science-fiction horror writer whose premises were simple enough that they could be easily grasped, yet were boldly original. Read more …

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Mortal Engines & Broken Humanists

2,355 words

Mortal Engines is an action-adventure yarn spanning four books by teen fiction author Philip Reeve, first published in 2001. With the recent box-office flop of the movie adaptation, it’s an opportune time to share some thoughts on the strengths and weaknesses of this enduringly popular quartet. I first read Mortal Engines and its sequels (Predator’s Gold, Infernal Devices, and A Darkling Plain) in my mid-teens, and haven’t picked them up since, so the following is entirely from a decade’s worth of offhand contemplation.

Read more …

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Pulp Puppies & Competent Men:
John W. Campbell, Jr. & the Supermen of Science Fiction

9,259 words

Alec Nevala-Lee
Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction
New York: Dey Street Books, 2018

“We seek nothing less than a Campbellian revolution in genre literature.” — Vox Day[1]

 “The Campbell that influenced me was John W., not Joseph.” — George R. R. Martin

Read more …

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Five Books that Shook My World (2018)

547 words

1. Camille Paglia, Provocations: Collected Essays on Art, Feminism, Politics, Sex, and Education (New York: Pantheon, 2018).

Paglia is self-recommending, of course. I was a bit let down, as the subtitle seemed to promise a career-wide retrospective, while this is more like a reunion tour, with emphasis on more recent works. The key essays are a vast survey, “Cults and Cosmic Consciousness: Religious Vision in the American 1960s,” a liberal education in itself; Read more …

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Jodorowsky’s Dune

1,001 words

Jodorowsky’s Dune, Frank Pavich’s 2013 documentary, tells the story of the “greatest movie never made,” Read more …

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Attack of the Bugmen!
Heinlein & Verhoeven’s Starship Troopers

2,269 words

Robert Heinlein’s novel Starship Troopers is a genre-defining classic of science fiction. First published in 1959, Heinlein’s work is audacious in propounding aristocratic militarism, will-to-power, social inequality, and contempt for liberal and mercantile values. Starship Troopers describes the path of a young man, Johnny Rico, from uncertain recruit to achieving the rank of Field Officer in an interstellar war against the “Bugs,” a species of giant arachnids. Read more …

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The Sci-Fi Channel’s Dune & Children of Dune

1,723 words

David Lynch’s Dune (1984) is a flawed masterpiece. When I first saw it, I was deeply disappointed. Frank Herbert’s original novel made a powerful impression on me. I could see Herbert’s world, and Lynch’s vision was not my vision. But when my initial impression faded and I returned to Lynch’s film with an open mind, I found it immensely imaginative and compelling. Even the score by Toto managed to grow on me.  Read more …

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Technological Utopianism & Ethnic Nationalism

2,904 words

Author’s Note:

This is the text of my talk at the fourth meeting of the Scandza Forum in Copenhagen, Denmark, on September 15, 2018. In my previous Scandza Forum talk, I argued that we need to craft ethnonationalist messages for all white groups, even Trekkies. This is my Epistle to the Trekkies. I want to thank everybody who was there, and everybody who made the Forum possible.  Read more …

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Hunter / Prey: Pro-White Sci-Fi

1,450 words

Hunter / Prey
Written & directed by Sandy Collora
Starring Isaac C. Singleton, Jr. & Damion Poitier
(2010)

“I sold my comics to make this movie!” — Sandy Collora

Hunter / Prey is an independent sci-fi movie from 2010 by producer Sandy Collora. Read more …

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