Tag Archives: movie reviews

Print this post Print this post

The Hunt

943 words

Jason Blum and Craig Zobel’s The Hunt received mixed reviews regarding its sensational plot, where a group of rich corporate types kidnaps Americans — “deplorable” rednecks — to hunt them down.

The Most Dangerous Game, the 1931 adaptation of Richard Connell’s 1924 short story of the same name, is the original source of the “people hunting other people” concept. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Adam Curtis’ Can’t Get You Out of My Head

1,789 words

Adam Curtis has been compiling and documenting the nature of power in the world for over two decades now for the BBC. Those of us who reside in the UK and are required by law to pay a yearly sum of £157.50 ($218.35) for a television license, and for many native British people, paying this sum has been increasingly feeling like a spit in the face. Adam Curtis’ documentaries have been the one reprieve from the stream of abuse and guilt-tripping amongst the state-sponsored news media and junk celebrity TV.   Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Responses
Print this post Print this post

American History X 

2,616 words

Director Tony Kaye’s anti-skinhead morality tale American History X (1998) is proof that propaganda is far from an exact science. Just as Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket caused a surge in Marine recruitment, American History X actually increases audience sympathies with neo-Nazi skinheads, despite its best efforts to present them as hateful hypocrites and losers.  Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 60 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Allegheny Uprising:
A Trump Movie

1,123 words

Every movement needs a movie. Liberals have To Kill a Mockingbird, conservatives have Patton, but what about Trump and the deplorables? The movement has anger and followers, but no film — here’s one.

Allegheny Uprising (1939) is a John Wayne and Claire Trevor film based on Jim Smith’s uprising in the Conococheague Valley after the French and Indian War. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Santa Fe Trail

1,335 words

So they want to ban Gone With the Wind? Pity, because a movie they would really like to strangle is Santa Fe Trail. Made in 1940, Santa Fe Trail is an Errol Flynn/Olivia de Havilland Western with lots of action and romance that discusses slavery and the Southern point of view in rational terms.

Errol Flynn plays Jeb Stuart, and Ronald Reagan plays George Custer. They are classmates at West Point in 1854 Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Dirty Harry

1,683 words

Dirty Harry (1971), directed by Don Siegel and starring Clint Eastwood as San Francisco Police Inspector Harry Callahan, is a classic of Right-wing cinema. Dirty Harry was hugely popular with moviegoers, spawning four sequels and a whole genre of films about tough cops whose hands are tied by the system and are forced to go outside the law in order to protect the public.

Dirty Harry articulated the growing reaction to the racial unrest, hippy degeneracy, and liberal mush of the 1960s, Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Fantastic Fantastic Mr. Fox

3,706 words

Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) is a wonderful film designed and directed by Wes Anderson. It was his first stop-motion animation, and its success led to its even wilder spiritual successor Isle of Dogs, an important landmark in Japanophile cinema. Around the time of its release, Fantastic Mr. Fox stood alongside other unusual works like Rango (2011), Chicken Run (2000), Up (2009), and Where the Wild Things Are (2009), all released in a period of scintillating creativity in the animated film industry.

This period began in 1996 with the release of Toy Story and ended in 2012 with the release of the first Avengers film, Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Elephant Man

2,907 words

David Lynch’s second feature film, The Elephant Man (1980), is one of his finest works. In many ways, The Elephant Man is Lynch’s most conventional “Hollywood” film. (Dune too is a “Hollywood” film, but a failed one.) The cast of The Elephant Man is quite distinguished, including John Hurt, Anthony Hopkins, Sir John Gielgud, Dame Wendy Hiller, and Anne Bancroft. The film was produced by Mel Brooks, who left his name off so that people would not expect a comedy. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Taxi Driver

2,241 words

I am inaugurating a series on Classics of Right-Wing Cinema with Martin Scorsese’s 1976 masterpiece Taxi Driver. For the purposes of this series, what makes a film “Right-wing” is its subject matter, its message, or simply how it resonates with people on the Right, regardless of the filmmaker’s intent. Please feel free to nominate films for this series in the comments below.

* * *

It began with Dylann Roof. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 33 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Fanny & Alexander

3,053 words

Ingmar Bergman’s Fanny and Alexander (1982) is one of his finest works. Fanny and Alexander runs 312 minutes—more than five hours. Bergman cut it down to a 188-minute version for theatrical release. The full version was shown as a miniseries on Swedish television but was also released in theaters, making it one of the longest theatrical films in history. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , | 1 Response
Print this post Print this post

It’s a Wonderful Life

1,892 words

In keeping with my annual Christmas season ritual, I am currently enjoying a much-needed vacation with extended family in Appalachia. Every year, my aging aunt graciously hosts my family: me, my children, and our dog. This year the experience has been all the more special because she bought a DVD copy of It’s a Wonderful Life, the 1946 Christmas classic starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed, and last night we gathered around her flatscreen to watch it. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 17 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Once Upon a Time in London, Nassau, New Orleans, & Elsewhere:
Making the World Safe for Satan & Veggie Burgers

5,945 words

Sympathy For The Devil: The True Story of The Process Church of the Final Judgment
Director: Neil Edwards
Appearing: Malachi McCormick, Timothy Wyllie, and other former members, along with George Clinton, Lucien Greaves, John Waters, Genesis P-Orridge, and others.
1 hour, 46 minutes; 2015

“What about the Process?” I said. “Don’t they have a place here? Maybe a delicatessen or something? With a few tables in the back? Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The No Time to Die Trailers

1,779 words

Since my pre-review based on the first trailer of Denis Villeneuve’s much-anticipated and much-postponed Dune got a good discussion going, I decided to do the same with the equally-hyped, equally-postponed Bond movie No Time to Die.

Everybody has a time to die, including James Bond. Bond has cheated death countless times, but this time his number may be up. If so, the death certificate will list COVID-19. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Other Face of Terror

1,218 words

The Other Face of Terror (1984)
Directed by Ludi Boeken
BBC Channel Four

I came to realize there was a common motivating factor. It was hatred.

— Ray Hill

Ray Hill’s corpulent face and receding hairline fill the screen. He plucks a membership card for the secretive Column 88 out of an outsize jacket pocket, Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Second Civil War:
Did a 1997 HBO Film Accidentally Presage Today’s America?

2,458 words

In 1998, when I was 12 years old, my father and I were watching television one evening when we stumbled upon an HBO made-for-TV movie called The Second Civil War.

The film has been largely forgotten in the years since, but its content — and the eerily accurate predictions within it — are quite astounding to behold today, 22 years later.

The film was directed by Joe Dante and has an ensemble cast featuring Denis Leary, Dan Hedaya, James Earl Jones, Beau Bridges, Phil Hartman, Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Hillbilly Elegy: Movie vs. Book

J. D. Vance.

2,212 words

There are many odd and irksome things about the new Hillbilly Elegy movie on Netflix. For my money, the strangest aspect of the production is that it has only a superficial resemblance to J. D. Vance’s 2016 book. It’s as though you were to make a movie of Moby-Dick, knowing only that it has a ship and a white spermaceti whale and a mad captain who stumps around on a peg-leg. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 19 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Withnail & I

2,283 words

Withnail & I (1987) is a masterpiece of British dark-comic satire written and directed by actor, novelist, and screenwriter Bruce Robinson, who went on to write and direct How to Get Ahead in Advertising (1989), another strong film in a similar vein. His career seems to have petered out, though, after a couple of flops, Jennifer 8 (1992) and The Rum Diary (2011).

Richard E. Grant made his film debut playing Withnail. (He was also the lead in How to Get Ahead in Advertising.) Paul McGann played Marwood, the “I” in the title. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

1,543 words

David Lynch’s 1992 movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me is his prequel to the Twin Peaks series, which ran on ABC from 1990 to 1991. Fire Walk with Me was a flop with critics and moviegoers, except in Japan. This is unjust, because Fire Walk with Me is a very fine movie. I won’t say it is Lynch’s best work. That praise belongs to Blue Velvet alone. But the music to Fire Walk with Me is composer Angelo Badalamenti’s best work ever. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Music & Meaning in Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru

1,985 words

It would be easy to make Akira Kurosawa’s 1952 masterpiece Ikiru into something trite and hopeful — like an existential affirmation of life. But that wouldn’t be right. Despite the film’s title translating into English as “to live,” the film poignantly demonstrates how any real meaning life has is barely hanging by a thread. In fact, you would have to be a little crazy — or on death’s door — to act upon this meaning at all. You will be going against the grain, you see. Humanity is organized in such a way to impede meaning. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Borat: Subsequent Moviefilm

1,976 words

There are many bad films out there.

There are many cynical cash grab films. There are many sequels that should have never been made. There are many films that serve to convince the makers that their time has not come and gone. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 15 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Event Horizon

1,729 words

If you’re looking for a film to get you good and spooked for Halloween, you can’t go wrong with Event Horizon, the 1996 sci-fi horror directed by Paul W. S. Anderson. The spooky atmosphere, the gore, the violence, the senselessness of the horror, the simultaneous claustrophobia and agoraphobia of a vast, cavernous spaceship in Neptune’s upper atmosphere all add up to provide a unique experience. But more important to us is the existential meaning of such horrors as the movie has to offer. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 36 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The First Dune Trailer

2,194 words

If movies can have previews, why can’t movie critics release “pre-reviews”? I ask because September 9th was the release date of the first trailer for the first half of Denis Villeneuve’s adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune.

Dune is one of the most-anticipated movies of 2020. Trailers can build up a lot of excitement for a film, but they are immediately forgotten when the movie actually appears. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 31 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea

1,256 words

Yukio Mishima’s 1963 novel The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea is one of his darkest works. Set in post-War Yokohama, it is the story of Fusako Kuroda, a thirty-three-year-old widow who runs a boutique selling Western luxury goods, and her thirteen-year-old son Noboru Kuroda. (See Alex Graham’s discussion of the novel here.)

Fusako’s world is entirely feminine, bourgeois, modern, and Western. She is also deeply lonely. Then she meets Ryuji Tsukazaki, the second-mate on a steamship. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Civil War Movies:
Good vs. Bad

1,841 words

There was a time that the American mainstream was really interested in the US Civil War of 1860-1865. That time was before Obama’s gloomy second term empowered the insane asylum of weeping non-whites, deviants, mattoids, and Marxists that rejected all American history Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Milk

2,412 words

The 2008 film Milk is a docudrama about America’s first openly gay politician. He served in the city government of San Francisco. (Where else, right?) Harvey Milk’s reputation has grown over the years. The circumstances of his demise turned him into a martyr figure. This overshadows some of his less clever moves, such as his support of Jim Jones. He wasn’t the only liberal politician who looked very silly after the People’s Temple did their final act as a death cult, but still — really, dude? Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Hater (2020)
& other works by Jan Komasa

The Outsider becomes an inside man.

3,486 words

The Hater (2020) is a slow and gritty tale of an outsider working at a troll farm in Warsaw as the city’s political factions are in an upheaval. Liberal politicians are confronted in the streets and on social media as nationalist Poland pushes back against anything akin to the oppressive socialist regime of the twentieth century. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Tenet

1,170 words

Christopher Nolan is one of my favorite living filmmakers. Tenet is Nolan’s new sci-fi espionage thriller. Tenet is highly imaginative and visually striking, filmed on locations in Denmark, Estonia, India, Italy, Norway, and the UK. Its cast includes Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Michael Caine, and Kenneth Branagh.

But Tenet is not Nolan’s best work, for two main reasons. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 19 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Empire of Dust

2,131 words

The 2011 documentary Empire of Dust provides a one-of-a-kind portrayal of the difficulties facing a construction crew attempting to redo a badly dilapidated Congolese highway. Early on we meet Eddy, playing a key role as a translator. Clearly, he is exceptional: he knows Swahili, Chinese, French, and English, and this takes some doing. The other major figure is Lao Yang, the project manager for the CREC-7 construction company. Surely he’s one of the most flustered Oriental expatriates in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Leni Riefenstahl
(August 22, 1902–September 8, 2003)

782 words

German translation here

Helene Bertha Amalie “Leni” Riefenstahl was born on this day in Berlin in 1902. She died in Pöcking, Bavaria, on September 8, 2003, just after her 101st birthday. She was a highly accomplished dancer, actress, photographer, and film director. 

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 17 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Africa Addio

1,550 words

Africa Addio (Goodbye Africa) (1966), co-directed, co-edited, and co-authored by Gualtiero Jacopetti and Franco Prosperi of Mondo Cane fame, is a must-see red-pill documentary for race-realists. Filmed between 1963 and 1965 in Kenya, Tanganyika, Zanzibar, Rwanda, Angola, the Belgian Congo, and South Africa, Africa Addio chronicles the exit of the British and Belgian colonial powers from Africa, as well as the attempts of the Portuguese and South Africa whites to hold on. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Responses
  • Our Titles

    White Identity Politics

    Here’s the Thing

    Trevor Lynch: Part Four of the Trilogy

    Graduate School with Heidegger

    It’s Okay to Be White

    Imperium

    The Enemy of Europe

    The World in Flames

    The White Nationalist Manifesto

    From Plato to Postmodernism

    The Gizmo

    Return of the Son of Trevor Lynch's CENSORED Guide to the Movies

    Toward a New Nationalism

    The Smut Book

    The Alternative Right

    My Nationalist Pony

    Dark Right: Batman Viewed From the Right

    The Philatelist

    Novel Folklore

    Confessions of an Anti-Feminist

    East and West

    Though We Be Dead, Yet Our Day Will Come

    White Like You

    The Homo and the Negro, Second Edition

    Numinous Machines

    Venus and Her Thugs

    Cynosura

    North American New Right, vol. 2

    You Asked For It

    More Artists of the Right

    Extremists: Studies in Metapolitics

    Rising

    The Importance of James Bond

    In Defense of Prejudice

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater (2nd ed.)

    The Hypocrisies of Heaven

    Waking Up from the American Dream

    Green Nazis in Space!

    Truth, Justice, and a Nice White Country

    Heidegger in Chicago

    The End of an Era

    Sexual Utopia in Power

    What is a Rune? & Other Essays

    Son of Trevor Lynch's White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    The Lightning & the Sun

    The Eldritch Evola

    Western Civilization Bites Back

    New Right vs. Old Right

    Lost Violent Souls

    Journey Late at Night: Poems and Translations

    The Non-Hindu Indians & Indian Unity

    Baader Meinhof ceramic pistol, Charles Kraaft 2013

    Jonathan Bowden as Dirty Harry

    The Lost Philosopher, Second Expanded Edition

    Trevor Lynch's A White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    And Time Rolls On

    The Homo & the Negro

    Artists of the Right

    North American New Right, Vol. 1

    Some Thoughts on Hitler

    Tikkun Olam and Other Poems

    Under the Nihil

    Summoning the Gods

    Hold Back This Day

    The Columbine Pilgrim

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater

    Taking Our Own Side

    Toward the White Republic

    Distributed Titles

    Reuben

    The Node

    The New Austerities

    Morning Crafts

    The Passing of a Profit & Other Forgotten Stories

    Gold in the Furnace

    Defiance