Tag Archives: poetry

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Remembering Rudyard Kipling
(December 30, 1865-January 18, 1936)

Phil Eiger Newmann, Kipling, 2020.

3,244 words

Nobel Prize-winning poet and novelist Rudyard Kipling was born on this day in 1865. For an introduction to his life and works, see the following articles on this site.

Read more …

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The Plymouth 400 Symposium
Robert Frost’s “Directive”:
A Quintessential Yankee Poem by New England’s Quintessential Yankee Poet

Puritan-descended poet Robert Frost in the 1910s, about 40 years old. Even his physiognomy was Yankee.

1,853 words

Discussing Robert Frost’s collection Steeple Bush in the New York Times upon its release in 1947, poet Randall Jarrell devoted the bulk of his review to quoting and summarizing just one poem, “Directive,” saying,

Reading through Frost’s new book one stops for a long time at “Directive. . . .” There are weak places in the poem, but these are nothing . . . Read more …

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Heroic Road Songs

Simon Marmion, The Eight Phases of the Song of Roland, ca. 15th century.

1,863 words

I sold my car before moving to Europe a few years ago. I had this car for several years and took it on various road trips across the US. During a few of these trips, I thought about The Song of Roland, the French poem from the 11th century. From tales of tragedy to stories of heroism, this epic poem has given me a lot to think about during the various road trips of my life. Read more …

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I Knew You When Your Eyes Were Blue

Paul Albert Besnard, The First Morning, 1881.

341 words

Your heart rate dropped precipitously
Like the bottom of my mind at its apogee
The angels were clamoring for your wings
Despite what they say, they are terrible things
Immeasurable for the dread in me
But I love you unspeakably because Read more …

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Remembering Ezra Pound
(October 30, 1885 to November 1, 1972)

713 words

“A slave is one who waits for someone else to free him.” — Ezra Pound

One of the ongoing projects of the North American New Right is the recovery of our tradition. One does not have to go too far back before one discovers that every great European thinker and artist is a “Right Wing extremist” by today’s standards.

Read more …

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Remembering Aleister Crowley
(October 12, 1875–December 1, 1947)

Aleister Crowley by Charles Krafft

424 words

Aleister Crowley was an English poet, novelist, painter, and mountaineer who is most famous as an occultist, ceremonial magician, and founder of the religion and philosophy of Thelema. But ironically Crowley’s supposed Satanism and Black Magic are far less frightening to most people than his politics. For Aleister Crowley was also a man of the Right.

Read more …

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Remembering Roy Campbell
(October 2, 1901–April 22, 1957)

Roy Campbell

1,562 words

Roy Campbell was a South African poet and essayist. T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, and Edith Sitwell praised Campbell as one of the best poets of the inter-war period. Unfortunately, his conservatism, Nietzscheanism, and Catholicism, as well as his open contempt for the Bloomsbury set and his participation in the Spanish Civil War on the Fascist side, have led his works being consigned to the memory hole. Read more …

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Remembering T. S. Eliot:
September 26, 1888–January 4, 1965

231 words

Thomas Stearns Eliot was one of the 20th century’s most influential poets, as well as an essayist, literary critic, playwright, and publisher. He won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1948. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, from old New England stock, Eliot emigrated to England in 1914 and was naturalized as a British subject in 1927.

Read more …

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A Home of Their Own

Antoni Piotrowski, The Batak Massacre, 1889.

1,784 words

I spent a long summer in Sofia, Bulgaria to explore the area and attend a few heavy metal concerts. During my time there, I took daily walks through the city center where I passed by stray dogs, ancient ruins, and historic monuments. Many of these monuments were dedicated to the countless individuals that lost their lives Read more …

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Angel of Avalon

1,746 words

“My favorite singer out of all the British girls that ever were.”

— Robert Plant

I first came across the name Sandy Denny on the liner notes of the classic Led Zeppelin IV. Read more …

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Remembering William Butler Yeats:
June 13, 1865–January 28, 1939

William Butler Yeats, 1865-1939

170 words

William Butler Yeats, the Irish poet, playwright, and politician, was born on this day in 1865. One of the greatest literary figures of the 20th century, Yeats’ life and work straddle the great divide between Romanticism and Modernism. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923.

In life and in art, Yeats rejected modern rationalism, materialism, and egalitarianism. He saw them as coarsening and brutalizing.

Read more …

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Owen Barfield’s History in English Words

3,323 words

Owen Barfield
History in English Words
New York: Doubleday & Company, 1926

In the common words we use every day, souls of past races, the thoughts and feelings of individual men stand around us, not dead, but frozen into their attitudes like the courtiers in the garden of the Sleeping Beauty.

— Owen Barfield Read more …

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Troubadours, Dissidents, & Legends

1,492 words

Sometimes the myths and legends of a person overshadow their real characteristics. Yet both aspects are important. Without the real-life person and his actions, the myths and legends of that person would never be created. Read more …

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The Future of the Past

Praça Do Comércio

2,483 words

“John of Gaunt’s speech having shown that patriotic verse can be poetry of a high order, Pessoa in Mensagem showed this still to be true. Most of the poems also go beyond patriotism: those in which King Sebastian figures are metaphors for the religious quest, and those about the ordeals of the seafarers dramatize the poet’s inner perseverance.”

— Jonathan Griffin (Introduction to Mensagem, 2007) Read more …

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Approaching D’Annunzio

1,284 words

Reviewing a story collection in 1925, an American critic compared Gabriele d’Annunzio’s influence on the Italian mindset to that of Rudyard Kipling in England. “[T]o understand him is to understand pre-war and immediately post-war Italy.” [1] That sort of remark is almost inaccessible to us today; when we think of the Great War, if we think of the Great War at all, we surely don’t automatically think of Kipling or d’Annunzio. That is one hurdle in approaching d’Annunzio today. Read more …

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Australian Artists of the Right:
Ian Mudie

6,512 words

The idea of “Australianity,” the uniqueness of Australia as a nation and new nationality, has its origins both in the pioneer labor movement and in the novelists, poets, and artists who saw vast possibilities in building a new civilization unencumbered by the decay of the Old World. The first saw their “socialism” in terms of a non-doctrinaire “mateship” that could forge a new “race” called Australians: an amalgam of the sundry peoples that had settled Australia from Europe, Read more …

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Remembering A. R. D. “Rex” Fairburn:
February 2, 1904–March 25, 1957

97 words

Today is the birthday of New Zealand poet, essayist, Social Credit advocate, and social reformer Arthur Rex Dugard Fairburn, another Artist of the Right. In honor of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this site.

By Fairburn: Read more …

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Remembering Rudyard Kipling:
December 30, 1865 to January 18, 1936

3,063 words

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

Nobel Prize-winning poet and novelist Rudyard Kipling was born on this day in 1865. For an introduction to his life and works, see the following articles on this site.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 4 Responses
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The Unbearable Smallness of Modernity

1,733 words

There is an old joke that has been variously ascribed to everyone from Leopold von Ranke to Henry Kissinger to the effect that “campus politics are the most vicious of all because the stakes are so low.” Everywhere I go now it seems that campus-style politics predominate. Sure, we face an existential crisis in the West, but to what end? Our enemies now seem more worthy of our pity than of our contempt. Dr. Faust sold his soul to the Devil for unlimited power and Helen of Troy. Read more …

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The Unknown Soldier:
Geoffrey Bache Smith, Tolkien’s Inspiration

Geoffrey Bache Smith

1,432 words

Dark is the world our fathers left us,
Wearily, greyly the long years flow,
Almost the gloom has hope bereft us,
Far is the high gods’ song and low:

Sombre the crests of mountains lonely,
Leafless, wind-ridden, moan the trees;
Down in the valleys is twilight only.
Twilight over the mourning sea;

Time was when earth was always golden,
Time was when skies were always clear;
Spirits and souls of the heroes olden,
Faint are cries from the darkness, hear!

Read more …

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Remembering Ezra Pound:
October 30, 1885 to November 1, 1972

707 words

“A slave is one who waits for someone else to free him.” — Ezra Pound

One of the ongoing projects of the North American New Right is the recovery of our tradition. One does not have to go too far back before one discovers that every great European thinker and artist is a “Right Wing extremist” by today’s standards.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Response
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Remembering Aleister Crowley:
October 12, 1875–December 1, 1947

Aleister Crowley by Charles Krafft

382 words

Aleister Crowley was an English poet, novelist, painter, and mountaineer who is most famous as an occultist, ceremonial magician, and founder of the religion and philosophy of Thelema. But ironically Crowley’s supposed Satanism and Black Magic are far less frightening to most people than his politics. For Aleister Crowley was also a man of the Right.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Responses
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Remembering Roy Campbell:
October 2, 1901–April 22, 1957

Roy Campbell

1,561 words

Roy Campbell was a South African poet and essayist. T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, and Edith Sitwell praised Campbell as one of the best poets of the inter-war period. Unfortunately, his conservatism, Nietzscheanism, and Catholicism, as well as his open contempt for the Bloomsbury set and his participation in the Spanish Civil War on the Fascist side, have led his works to be consigned to the memory hole. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Responses
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Death & Rebirth: Three Poems

438 words

Rust Belt Hotel as Metaphor for America

It’s abandoned, it’s been abandoned for
About half a century now. Once it
Was impressive — vaulted ceilings, tall
Windows surrounded by a polished floor
Of marble, an art deco lobby . . . Bit
By bit, though, it all fell apart. Wall

Read more …

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Hijacking Icons

Dylan Thomas

1,435 words

Not for the proud man apart
From the raging moon I write
On these spindrift pages
Nor for the towering dead
With their nightingales and psalms
But for the lovers, their arms
Round the griefs of the ages,
Who pay no praise or wages
Nor heed my craft or art.

— From Dylan Thomas, “In My Craft and Sullen Art”

Read more …

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Lucifer

Mihai Eminescu

2,285 words

Nineteenth-century Romanian poet and editorialist Mihai Eminescu (1850-1889) studied in Bismarck’s Prussia, where he immersed himself in Schopenhauer and studied under Eugen Dühring. His essays attack liberalism, usury, immigration, and the prospect of Jewish civil rights in Romania. The tone of his philosophically-driven poems, which are modeled after the golden age of German Romantic poetry, ranges from endearing to brutal. Adored in Romania, but without much of a reputation outside of his own country, he was killed by medical malpractice at the age of 39. Read more …

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Remembering A. R. D. “Rex” Fairburn:
February 2, 1904–March 25, 1957

97 words

Today is the birthday of New Zealand poet, essayist, Social Credit advocate, and social reformer Arthur Rex Dugard Fairburn, another Artist of the Right. In honor of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this site.

By Fairburn: Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , | 1 Response
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Remembering Rudyard Kipling:
December 30, 1865 to January 18, 1936

3,063 words

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

Nobel Prize-winning poet and novelist Rudyard Kipling was born on this day in 1865. For an introduction to his life and works, see the following articles on this site.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Ezra Pound:
October 30, 1885 to November 1, 1972

702 words

“A slave is one who waits for someone else to free him.” — Ezra Pound

One of the ongoing projects of the North American New Right is the recovery of our tradition. One does not have to go too far back before one discovers that every great European thinker and artist is a “Right Wing extremist” by today’s standards.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 3 Responses
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Remembering Aleister Crowley:
October 12, 1875–December 1, 1947

Aleister Crowley by Charles Krafft

364 words

Aleister Crowley was an English poet, novelist, painter, and mountaineer who is most famous as an occultist, ceremonial magician, and founder of the religion and philosophy of Thelema. But ironically Crowley’s supposed Satanism and Black Magic are far less frightening to most people than his politics. For Aleister Crowley was also a man of the Right.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 9 Responses
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