Tag Archives: literature

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Inheritors of the Earth:
Port, Plain, & Mountain in Western Culture

Caspar David Friedrich, Greifswald in Moonlight, 1817.

9,130 words

As men and women of the Right, we are searchers for Truth. We believe that by finding Truth and living by Truth, we might know Beauty, and we might know ourselves. Essence is our mission and with it, survival. And so this essay will try to surface and then sketch three fundamental “lifeways,” Read more …

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Remembering Yukio Mishima
(January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970)

948 words

Spanish translation here

Yukio Mishima was one of the giants of 20th-century Japanese literature. He has exercised an enduring influence on the post-World War II European and North American New Right. In commemoration of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this website:

Read more …

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Remembering Jack London
(January 12, 1876–November 22, 1916)

Phil Eiger Newmann, Jack London, 2021

467 words

Spanish version here

Jack London was born John Griffith Chaney in San Francisco on January 12, 1876. An adventurer and Jack of all trades in his youth, London achieved fame and fortune as a fiction writer and journalist. Read more …

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“You Owe Them Everything!”
A Review of Spencer Quinn’s Charity’s Blade

John Everett Millais’ Joan of Arc, The Maid of Orléans (1865)

3,902 words

I have both the pleasure of informing Counter-Currents readers of an upcoming novel authored by Mr. Spencer Quinn and of reviewing this latest addition to white nationalist-friendly fiction. When critiquing an author (especially for the first time), I like to get a sense of his Weltanschauung by reading and synthesizing some of his other works in conjunction with the monograph in question. Thus, I will also refer throughout to a few of his salient articles. Read more …

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Ethnic Threats & Anglo-American Civilization in Howard & Lovecraft

Swamp in Sam Houston National Forest, Texas

4,025 words

Both Robert E. Howard (1906-1936) and H. P. Lovecraft (1890-1937) were masters of the pulp horror story. While the former placed action at the heart of his masculine and violent tales, the latter focused more on psychology and the “cosmic” dread of an indifferent universe. Read more …

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No Country for Old Ghosts:
A Literary Tour of Gothic America

8,232 words

As an American, I find European theories about this country and its character intriguing (or amusing) — particularly those formed from intimate experience. Of course, such theories presuppose that there is and has been such a thing as “the American people,” or “ethny” from which to draw an assessment. I submit two, not quite antithetical, but competing European judgments about the United States. Read more …

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Remembering Henry Williamson
(December 1, 1895-August 13, 1977)

Henry Williamson

107 words

In commemoration of the birthday of the great English novelist, ecologist, and racial nationalist Henry Williamson, I wish to draw your attention to some articles on this site:

Read more …

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Sun & Steel:
The Tatenokai Phenomenon in Brief

1,919 words

In post-1945 Japan — as in most of the states that lost in World War II — American occupation brought about radical political and social changes. In the 1946 to 1948 Tokyo trial (similar to Nuremberg), several leaders of the war cabinet were sentenced to death or long prison terms. It was also stipulated in the constitution that Japan cannot have its own armed forces, only Jieitai (Japan Self Defense Forces), a small number of volunteers for self-defense purposes. Read more …

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Remembering Yukio Mishima
(January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970)

798 words

Spanish translation here

Yukio Mishima was one of the giants of 20th-century Japanese literature. He has exercised an enduring influence on the post-World War II European and North American New Right. In commemoration of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this website: Read more …

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Remembering P. R. Stephensen
(November 20, 1901-May 28, 1965)

P. R. Stephensen, circa 1934

249 words

Percy Reginald Stephensen was born on November 20, 1901. Stephensen was a writer, publisher, and political activist dedicated to the interests of the white race and the Australian nation. Like Jack London, Stephensen was an archetypal man of the racially conscious Left. He began his political career as a Communist but later moved to the nationalistic, anti-Semitic Right. From 1942 to 1945, he was interned without trial for his pro-German and pro-Japanese sympathies.

Read more …

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Remembering Wyndham Lewis
(November 18, 1882-March 7, 1957)

166 words

Wyndham Lewis was born on this day in 1882. A first-rate novelist, critic, and painter, he was a leading English exponent of fascist modernism. In honor of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this website:

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Racial Satire: An American Mirror

4,781 words

Sometime in the early 2000s, the retail chain Urban Outfitters began selling a board game based on a Hasbro classic, called Ghettopoly. The box cover, made to look like a hoodlum had graffiti-painted its title across an alley wall, also featured a black “gangsta” holding a bottle of ‘shine in one paw and a gun loaded with an extra magazine Read more …

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Interview with Spencer J. Quinn on My Mirror Tells A Story

1,325 words

Greg Johnson: How did you come up with the idea for this book?

Spencer Quinn: I had just started writing for Counter-Currents in 2016, and I was kicking around for novel ways to get our message across. At that time most of us were on social media, and so after a few months I felt fairly certain that the idea of a Dissident Right children’s book Read more …

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Remembering Ezra Pound
(October 30, 1885 to November 1, 1972)

713 words

“A slave is one who waits for someone else to free him.” — Ezra Pound

One of the ongoing projects of the North American New Right is the recovery of our tradition. One does not have to go too far back before one discovers that every great European thinker and artist is a “Right Wing extremist” by today’s standards.

Read more …

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A Helping Hand

Lucas van Valckenborch, View of Antwerp with the frozen Scheldt, 1590.

1,761 words

As I have gotten older, I find myself thinking about the fleeting nature of time. I often ask myself whether I have wasted too much time playing video games, reading fantasy books, or attending heavy metal concerts. Yet without these hobbies, I would have never visited Antwerp Read more …

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Remembering Roy Campbell
(October 2, 1901–April 22, 1957)

Roy Campbell

1,562 words

Roy Campbell was a South African poet and essayist. T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, and Edith Sitwell praised Campbell as one of the best poets of the inter-war period. Unfortunately, his conservatism, Nietzscheanism, and Catholicism, as well as his open contempt for the Bloomsbury set and his participation in the Spanish Civil War on the Fascist side, have led his works being consigned to the memory hole. Read more …

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De Descriptione Temporum:
A Description of Our Times

2,224 words

If they embark on this course, the difference between the old and the new education will be an important one. Where the old initiated, the new merely “conditions.” The old dealt with its pupils as grown birds deal with young birds when they teach them to fly; the new deals with them more as the poultry-keeper deals with young birds — making them thus or thus for purposes of which the birds know nothing. Read more …

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Remembering H. P. Lovecraft
(August 20, 1890–March 15, 1937)

896 words

Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born on August 20, 1890, in Providence, Rhode Island, and died there of cancer on March 15, 1937. An heir to Poe and Hawthorne, Lovecraft is one of the pioneers of modern science fiction, fantasy, and horror literature. Lovecraft is a literary favorite in New Rightist circles, for reasons that will become clear from a perusal of the following works on this website.

Read more …

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Notre Dame des Fascistes,
Part I: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, & the Joy of Collaboration

Gertrude Stein.

6,991 words

Barbara Will
Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, and the Vichy Dilemma (Gender and Culture Series)
New York City: Columbia University Press, 2011

The joy of the body, the most honorable and fecund joy of all, reign[s] in America.

— Bernard Faÿ Read more …

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Remembering Knut Hamsun
(August 4, 1859–February 19, 1952)

427 words

Knut Hamsun was born Knut Pedersen in Lom, Norway on August 4, 1859. He died in Grimstad, Norway, on February 19, 1952. The author of more than twenty novels, plus poems, short stories, plays, and essays, Hamsun was one of the twentieth century’s most influential writers. His rejection of both Romanticism and naturalism, his emphasis on outsiders and rebels, and his exploration of inner and sometimes extreme states of consciousness, made him a pioneer of literary modernism. Read more …

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No Fantasy for White Men

Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Defending the Sampo, 1896.

1,641 words

I grew up reading fantasy books. Throughout my teenage years, fantasy books gave me countless hours of entertainment. Yet with any form of entertainment that has a predominantly white male audience, Read more …

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Remembering William Butler Yeats:
June 13, 1865–January 28, 1939

William Butler Yeats, 1865-1939

170 words

William Butler Yeats, the Irish poet, playwright, and politician, was born on this day in 1865. One of the greatest literary figures of the 20th century, Yeats’ life and work straddle the great divide between Romanticism and Modernism. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923.

In life and in art, Yeats rejected modern rationalism, materialism, and egalitarianism. He saw them as coarsening and brutalizing.

Read more …

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Remembering Louis-Ferdinand Céline
(May 27, 1894–July 1, 1961)

215 words

Louis-Ferdinand Céline was the pen name of French novelist, essayist, and physician Louis-Ferdinand-Auguste Destouches, who was born on this day in 1894. Céline is one of the giants of 20th-century literature. And, like Ezra Pound and so many other great writers of the last century, he was an open and unapologetic racial nationalist. For more on Céline, see the following works on this website: Read more …

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Owen Barfield’s History in English Words

3,323 words

Owen Barfield
History in English Words
New York: Doubleday & Company, 1926

In the common words we use every day, souls of past races, the thoughts and feelings of individual men stand around us, not dead, but frozen into their attitudes like the courtiers in the garden of the Sleeping Beauty.

— Owen Barfield Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 264
Four French Collaborationists:
Châteaubriant, Céline, Drieu, Brasillach

Alphonse de Châteaubriant

369 words / 58:30

To listen in a player, click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save link as” or “save target as.”

This is a lost London Forum talk by Michael Walker on four French artists of the Right: Alphonse de Châteaubriant, Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Pierre Drieu La Rochelle, and Robert Brasillach. Read more …

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Remembering Gabriele D’Annunzio:
March 12, 1863–March 1, 1938

142 words

Today is the birthday of Gabriele D’Annunzio, novelist, poet, playwright, aesthete, dandy, playboy, war hero, and the first fascist dictator, who from 1919 to 1920 ruled over the Adriatic city-state of Fiume, establishing many of the political and aesthetic forms followed by Mussolini a few years later.

To learn more about D’Annunzio’s life and accomplishments, see the following works on this site: Read more …

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The Art of N. C. Wyeth

N. C. Wyeth, American artist and illustrator

N. C. Wyeth

2,062 words

Newell Convers Wyeth, or N. C. Wyeth, was one of America’s greatest artists and illustrators. Over the course of his lifetime, he created over 3,000 paintings and illustrated over 100 books, including several Scribner Classics. His son, Andrew Wyeth, and grandson, Jamie Wyeth, also became prominent artists.

Wyeth was born in 1882 and grew up on a farm in Needham, Massachusetts. His childhood was an active one, and he often went hunting and fishing with his brothers. Read more …

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Ash Donaldson’s Brother War

2,108 wordsCover of Ash Donaldson's book, Brother War.

Ash Donaldson
Brother War: A Modern Myth for Those of European Descent
Independently published, 2019
More of Donaldson’s work is available through the White Art Collective.

Ash Donaldson’s latest novel Brother War: A Modern Myth for Those of European Descent combines the best of history, myth, and fantasy to spin an unforgettable story about World War I. Not only is it his best novel to date, but Brother War is also the first in his Mythology Series designed for an adult audience. Read more …

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Remembering Yukio Mishima:
January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970

700 words

Spanish translation here

Yukio Mishima was one of the giants of 20th-century Japanese literature. He has exercised an enduring influence on the post-World War II European and North American New Right. In commemoration of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this website:

By Mishima:

Read more …

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Remembering Jack London:
January 12, 1876–November 22, 1916

467 words

Spanish version here

Jack London was born John Griffith Chaney in San Francisco on January 12, 1876. An adventurer and Jack of all trades in his youth, London achieved fame and fortune as a fiction writer and journalist. But he never forgot his working class roots and remained a life-long advocate of workers’ rights, unionism, and revolutionary socialism. (See his essay “What Life Means to Me.”)

Read more …

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